Peanut Butter and Jam Chocolate Cups

 
Peanut butter and Jam Chocolate Cups ingredients and supplies set up.

Peanut butter and Jam Chocolate Cups ingredients and supplies set up.

A while ago I watched Creativebug's video, "Homemade Dark Chocolate Peanute Butter and Jelly Cups" and was excited to try making my own. 

Mark and I gathered the ingredients and supplies and put everything out on our kitchen island.  We used Ghiradelli chocolate chips, smooth peanut butter, graham crackers, confectioner's sugar, and jam.  We used apricot jam in half the chocolate cups and strawberry jam in the other half.  (We both liked the cups with apricot jam better, but it is a personal preference.  Use your favorite type of jam.) We made a half recipe, and it made about 16 cups.

We lined a large cookie sheet with parchment paper to protect the sheets from jam and messy melted chocolate.  I found mini paper cupcake liners at Michaels.  We used them for the chocolate cup molds and laid them out on the parchment sheet. 

The graham crackers were crushed in a food processor. Then we mixed the crushed graham crackers, the peanut butter, and the confectioner's sugar together for the peanut butter filling.  This made a soft, shape-able filling that we formed into little patties. 

Mixing peanut butter mixture filling

Mixing peanut butter mixture filling

Peanut butter mixture filling formed into patties

Peanut butter mixture filling formed into patties

The chocolate chips went into a Pyrex bowl and then into the microwave for melting.  We did short microwave times of about 30 seconds each, taking the chips out to stir after each microwave session, and were careful not to burn the chocolate.

When the chocolate was melted, we used little pastry brushes to brush the chocolate onto the insides of the paper cupcake liners.  We covered the bottoms and sides with the melted chocolate and then turned the liners upside down on the cookie sheet so the chocolate could run up the sides and thicken the walls.

Liners with melted chocolate brushed onto bottom and walls, then turned upside down on cookie sheet

Liners with melted chocolate brushed onto bottom and walls, then turned upside down on cookie sheet

The cookie sheet then went into the refrigerator to speed up the hardening of the chocolate.  When the chocolate was solid, we placed a peanut butter mixture inside each chocolate cup, and then some jam.  This was a messy project, but very easy and a lot of fun

Peanut butter mixture and jam filling added to hardened chocolate cups.

Peanut butter mixture and jam filling added to hardened chocolate cups.

Then we used the pastry brushes again to cover the filling with more melted chocolate.  We were careful to go all the way to the edges, so the fillings would be well encased inside the chocolate cups.

Melted chocolate brushed onto chocolate cups.

Melted chocolate brushed onto chocolate cups.

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The peanut butter and jam chocolate cups were seriously yummy!  But the chocolate wasn't tempered, so it started to melt while you were eating it and had to be kept in the refrigerator.

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Hacked Faux Fur Jacket for Sophie

 
Jacket WIP trying on.  Sleeves are longer to fit Sophie.

Jacket WIP trying on.  Sleeves are longer to fit Sophie.

I found a beautiful free download faux fur jacket pattern by Design by Lindsay and decided It would be perfect as a starting point for the jacket I had in mind.  I showed it to Sophie.  She loved it and asked if she could have it in the same fabric.  I was surprised to find the fabric was still available through fabric.com.  I found some soft, lovely dusty pink Bemberg rayon at Mood and some covered  Dritz hooks and eyes at Jo-Ann.  I set the printer to print at 100% for the size and printed out the pattern.  I lengthened the jacket a few inches,  flared the sides seams to be slightly A-line shaped, and raised the neckline to be a regular round neck.   I added side pockets and made them out of the lining fabric.  I also added covered hooks and eyes so the jacket could be worn closed.

Rayon lining pockets added to jacket side seams.

Rayon lining pockets added to jacket side seams.

I cut out the fabric using an x-acto knife cutting from the back and carefully going only through the backing fabric so I didn't cut any of the fur pile.  I sewed the body and lining separately and then sewed them together using a jacket bagging technique Threads has a clear tutorial for bagging a jacket lining here

My teddy bear sewing experience came in handy when constructing the jacket, as it is working with fur fabric pile.  I used an embroidery needle and my bunka brush to pull the fur out of the seams on both the inside and outside of the jacket. I trimmed all the fur out of the seam allowances and used a catch stitch to flatten and hold all the faux fur seam allowances and sleeve and garment hems against the  outer fabric. You can see a detailed catch stitch tutorial on the Craftsy blog.

Catch stitched shoulder, arm, and neck seams.

Catch stitched shoulder, arm, and neck seams.

Catch stitch close-up.

Catch stitch close-up.

 

I closed the opening in the hem created when I bagged the lining.  Lastly I hand sewed the five covered hooks and eyes to the front opening of the jacket.  Done! 

Covered hooks and eyes in process of hand sewing to jacket front.  (some pins still visible.

Covered hooks and eyes in process of hand sewing to jacket front.  (some pins still visible.

Sophie loves her faux fur jacket.

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